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Konstruktionismusconstructionism

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Konstruktionismus, constructionism

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Put simply, this means that children learn most effectively when they are doing things rather than just sitting and listening.
Von Bryan Appleyard im Text Why Microsoft and Intel tried to kill the XO $100 laptop (2008)
Constructionism proposes that technologies, computers as well as tangible manipulatives such as robotics, are powerful for educational purposes when used for supporting the design, the construction, and the programming of personally and epistemologically meaningful projects (Papert, 1980; Resnick, Bruckman, & Martin, 1996a).
Von Marina Umaschi Bers im Buch Blocks to Robots (2007) auf Seite 13
Constructionism is an approach to learning that emphasizes the production of public artifacts as a way of engaging with and learning about the world. From its roots in the logo programming language for children, to its inspiration of projects like One Laptop Per Child (OLPC), constructionism has had a profound effect on the way many researchers think about technology and education.
Von Andrea Forte, Amy Bruckman im Konferenz-Band WikiSym 2007 (2007) im Text Constructing Text
Beat Döbeli HoneggerDer Konstruktionismus ist eine aus der Erkenntnistheorie des Konstruktivismus abgeleitete Lerntheorie, die davon ausgeht, dass beim Bauen/Erstellen/Erschaffen von Objekten Lernen besonders effizient ist, weil Lernende einerseits intrinsisch motiviert sind, etwas Eigenständiges zu gestalten und weil man andererseits gewisse der Konstruktion innewohnende Prinzipien begriffen haben muss, um etwas Funktionierendes bauen zu können.
Von Beat Döbeli Honegger, erfasst im Biblionetz am 07.05.2015
Mitchel ResnickConstructionism involves two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experiences in the world. (This idea is based on the constructivist theories of Jean Plaget.) To this, constructionism adds the idea that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing products that are personally meaningful. They might be constructing sand casdes, LEGO machines, or computer programs. What's important is that they are actively engaged in creating something that is meaningful to themselves or to others around them.
Von Mitchel Resnick im Buch Turtles, Termites, and Traffic Jams (1994) im Text Constructions auf Seite 23
Mitchel ResnickThe term "constructionism" first coined by Seymour Papert, involves two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experiences in the world. (This idea is based on the theories of Jean Piaget.) To this, constructionism adds the idea that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products. They might be constructing sand castles, LEGO machines, computer programs, or virtual objects. What's important is that they are actively engaged in creating something that is meaningful to themselves and to others around them.
Von Amy Bruckman, Mitchel Resnick im Buch Constructionism in Practice im Text The MediaMOO Project (1995)
Heidi SchelhoweSeymour Papert entwickelte die Vorstellung vom "Konstruktionistischen Lernen" Paperts Ansatz basiert auf dem Verständnis des Konstruktivismus, das Lernen als aktiven Aufbau von Wissensstrukturen begreift. Wissen wird durch die Lernenden hergestellt, nicht von den Lehrenden vermittelt. Mit dem Konstruktionismus wird dies erweitert um die Vorstellung, dass dieser Aufbau von Wissensstrukturen dann besonders gut gelingen kann, wenn die Lernenden selbst etwas herstellen, konstruieren, ein äußerlich sichtbares, wahrnehmbares Objekt. Diese Objekte bezeichnet Papert als "Objects-to-think-with" Kinder sind dabei als aktive, ihr Lernen selbst organisierende und konstruierende Subjekte zu verstehen.
Von Heidi Schelhowe im Buch Technologie, Imagination und Lernen (2007) im Text Lernkulturen auf Seite 124
Mitchel ResnickConstructionism [Papert, 1991] is both a theory of learning and a strategy for education. Constructionism is based on two types of "construction." First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experiences in the world. People don't get ideas; they make them. (This idea is based on the constructivist theories of Jean Piaget.) To this, constructionism adds the idea that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally-meaningful products. They might be constructing sand castles, poems, LEG0 machines [Resnick, 1993], or computer programs [Harel, 1991; Kafai, 1995]. What's important is that they are actively engaged in creating something that is meaningful to themselves or to others around them.
Von Mitchel Resnick im Text Distributed Constructionism (1996)

iconBemerkungen

The maker movement is terribly exciting in the ways it celebrates the virtues of constructionism, even if the advocates of learning by making have no formal knowledge of the theory underlying their passions.
Von Sylvia Libow Martinez, Gary Stager im Buch Invent to Learn (2013) im Text Learning
We believe that “constructionism,” a similar-sounding term coined by Seymour Papert, is the learning theory that most strongly resonates within the maker movement and should be taken seriously by anyone investigating classroom making.
Von Sylvia Libow Martinez, Gary Stager im Buch Invent to Learn (2013) im Text Learning
Constructionism as a way of thinking about education carries with it an ideology of empowerment and choice. Ideally, learners choose what it is they want to do and learn through the process of engaging in open-ended, unstructured, playful but productive construction activities.
Von Andrea Forte, Amy Bruckman im Konferenz-Band WikiSym 2007 (2007) im Text Constructing Text
Yasmin B. KafaiConstructionism is not constructivism, as Piaget never intended his theory of knowledge development to be a theory of learning and teaching; nor is constructionist learning simply discovery learning and thus opposed to any forms of instruction; and last, in constructionism, people and not computers are seen as the driving force for educational change.
Von Yasmin B. Kafai im Buch The Cambridge Handbook of the Learning Sciences (2006) im Text Constructionism
Mitchel ResnickEducational designers cannot and should not control exactly what or when or how students will learn. The point is not to make a precise blueprint. Rather, practitioners of constructional design can only create "spaces" of possible activities and experiences. What we can do as constructional designers is to try to make those spaces dense with personal and epistemological connections-making it more likely for learners to find regions that are both appealing and intellectually interesting.
Von Mitchel Resnick, Amy Bruckman, Fred Martin im Text Pianos, not Stereos (1996)
Giasemi VavoulaMike SharplesThe general notion of constructionism (Papert’s re-phrasing of constructivism) was that by actively trying to create something concrete (either physical or computational) to solve a problem the learner naturally had to make their thinking – that which was implicit – explicit. Furthermore, having to make something concrete enabled the learner to ‘see’ the results of their thinking, whether it worked, and whether it needed revision (debugging). Papert argued that such a process fostered the development of metacognitive skills in the domain.
Von C. O’Malley, Giasemi Vavoula, J.P. Glew, Mike Sharples, P. Lefrere, Josie Taylor im Buch Guidelines for Learning/Teaching/Tutoring in a Mobile Environment (2003)
Constructivism, the theory of learning advanced in Mindstorms, had its roots in the work of Piaget. One of Piaget's best known contributions to developmental psychology was his stage theory of learning. By this theory, the child begins in the sensorimotor stage, advances in elementary school to the stage of concrete operations, and eventually moves on to the formal stage. In The Children's Machine, however, Papert calls Piaget 's stage theory of development into question. He contends that the concrete thinking of the bricoleur or bricoleuse, though deprecated in school settings, appears in the thought of even the most sophisticated adults. Theories of learning, he argues therefore, should not focus exclusively on the acquisition of formal reasoning skills, but also on the development of advanced skills for concrete reasoning.
Von Timothy D. Koschmann in der Zeitschrift The Journal of the Learning Sciences 6(4) (1997) im Text Logo-as-Latin Redux
Mitchel ResnickThe constructionist approach goes beyond hands-on in a variety of ways. In constructionist activities, students do not simply manipulate physical objects, they constuct personally meaningful products. It is easy to see how 'constructing" is better than merely "manipulating": children are sure to learn more by buildmg and programming their own robots rather than manipulating store-bought, fully assembled robots. But there is a deeper point here. Children are likely to become intellectually engaged only if they are constructing personally meaningful things. When students design and construct products that are meaningful to themselves (or to others around them), they tend to approach their work with a sense of caring and interest that is missing in most school activities. In doing so, students are more likely to explore, and to make deep "connections" with, the mathematical and scientific concepts that underlie the activities. Building and programming a merry-go-round is based on the same underlying principles as building and programming a classic robot - but for a child who cares more about merry-go-rounds than robots, the merry-go-round project offers a much richer learning experience.
Von Mitchel Resnick im Buch Turtles, Termites, and Traffic Jams (1994) im Text Constructions

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Verwandte Begriffe
(Cozitation)
LOGO (Programmiersprache)LOGO (programming language), Media Lab (MIT)Media Lab (MIT), Konstruktivismusconstructivism, Do It Yourself (DIY)Do It Yourself, microworldmicroworld

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